Around Clevedon and Cadbury Camp

This couldn’t quite compare to our lovely Pensford ramble, but was a pretty good walk none the less. We started in the town of Clevedon — once an agriculture village, but Victorian times transformed it into a seaside resort. It’s now home to the awesome Curzon Theatre, but we didn’t catch a film. The pier was nice, its cake mediocre. Climbing up the hill from there was quite beautiful, however, with stone walls along one side, water on the other.

Flickr Album Gallery Powered By: WP Frank

We came back down through a bit of the town, across rhines draining the levels reminding you that once these were all marshes, and fields where we saw deer leaping away through the grass. Under the motorway, which was actually quite enjoyable, and then up and up towards Cadbury Camp.

Aerial view of Cadbury Camp taken in 1946.
Aerial view of Cadbury Camp taken in 1946.

Occupied from the 6th century BCE through the 1st century AD, this was probably also contained a Roman settlement. From the National Trust site:

The Camp was built in the late Iron Age, probably by the Dobunni Tribe who lived in the Somerset Area. They dug out ditches and threw back the soil to make high banks for the fortress to protect them from any invading forces. They added a high timber fence on top of the bank and a complicated entrance to make it difficult for anyone to attack.

The name Cadbury meant Cada’s fort. Cada was an early Anglo Saxon personal name.

The site itself is lovely, with splendid views.

Clevedon Walk

But sadly there was more building along this walk, closed pubs, signs of rather obscene and unfriendly wealth in the form of high walls and no trespassing signs and things like this:

Clevedon Walk

Clevedon Walk

Not quite made up for by these rather more enjoyable examples of weirdness:

Clevedon Walk

Clevedon Walk

Save

Save

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.